Autism Fitness

Autism Fitness

For children living with autism, fitness is both essential and challenging. Children on the spectrum are still kids. They can play, run, swim, shoot baskets, kick a soccer ball, and play catch, just like their typical counterparts. They just need to be taught in an adapted fashion. Like most lessons taught to individuals on the spectrum, if you break them down, these lessons can be learned. At RnRFIT that is excatly what we aim at doing : breaking down simple excersices into even simpler steps so that kids can learn and have fun all at the same time

kids with autism may find fitness and physical activity difficult. Oversensitivity to sights, sounds, and tactile stimuli can affect participation, as can limit or cause delays in motor coordination and planning. Team sports can be especially challenging for kids with autism, who have trouble with communication and social interaction.

Even in the face of these challenges, it's important to find ways to help kids with autism try and even enjoy fitness. Exercise can prevent or reverse weight gain, and has therapeutic benefits too. Depending on the program and type of physical activity, participation can help with sensory integration, coordination and muscle tone, and social skills.

The sport of gymnastics can provide children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) access to a differentiated approach, which potentially can create a model program to meet each child’s individual needs in a unique and effective manner. Gymnastics is a sport that provides an enriching environment filled with opportunities for sharpening the mind by stimulating the brain, fostering social skills, and strengthening gross and fine motor skills, while providing children with ASD an alternative method for learning and developing new skills.

Besides improving fitness, motor function, and behavior in individuals with autism, the most important advantages of physical activity are the social implications of participating in sports and exercise. Physical activity can promote self-esteem, increase general levels of happiness, and can lead to positive social outcomes : all highly beneficial outcomes for individuals with autism.